This ‘Track of the Day’ article was written by John Gittins, a Gigsoup contributor.

Childhood sweethearts, garage and punk fanatics, and a passion for the Italian giallo soundtracks, The Limiñanas have always incorporated their unique tastes and intimate personalities into their music.  Originating from the coastal city of Perpignan, verging on the border of Spain, Lionel Limiñana and Marie Limiñana were gifted with the insight from two alternating cultures of Spain and France and the tourists that visited respected music scenes.  Taking advantage of the opportunity, the couple absorbed music of 60s and 80s, and all over the world, incorporating and re-contextualising to create their own unique image of it.

Now, with a number of albums under their belts, the band have now collaborated with Peter Hook, for their new single ‘Garden of Love’.  A moving, hypnotic track that is destined to accompany as a soundtrack for the lucid, blazing hot summers day to follow in the year.  Their previous works have shown a line of progression and development, telling intimate stories of love and loss, and personal investment.  In this interview I talked to the up and coming duo about their passion for Italian films, the concept behind their new album ‘Malamore’ and the progression of French music and where they stand in the midst of it.

Hi guys, I hope you are well. Your albums from the past have granted the listener a window into your personal experiences, such as Costa Blanca’s (2013) references to the Haiti earthquake in 2010 that you were both caught in the middle of. Are there any similar, personal themes to Malamore in this sense?

On the bottom ‘Malamore’ discusses stories of thwarted love, frustrations, & bad feelings around love stories. Regarding the aspect of the record we envisioned the disc as a series of stories with a beginning and an end, and recurring characters, but that does not evolve in the same scenery nor has the same time. Just like in the movies has Italian sketch of the sixties and seventies, as in “monsters” of Dino Risi for example. 

Another feature of Costa Blanca is the countless references to the 1960’s era of music. The title of your new album, Malamore, has been linked to a 1980’s Italian film. Does that hint towards a new era that you have moulded The Limiñanas towards?

From the film called “Malamore” we have only retained the title and the meaning. This is an Italian erotic series B realized by Visconti’s nephew. I’ve only seen extracts. We do not premeditate sound or the direction of the album when we start working on it. We would be incapable of doing so! Things happen naturally. The disc is in line with previous, I find it better recorded and better produced. But we changed nothing, we used the same tools and the same people who worked with us previously with a large basis of demo records & large selection of texts. Gradually it has shaped the sound and the story. Even if they’re about quite dramatic situations I find the result brighter than Crystal Anis or Costa Blanca.  Just like the cover.

From the 1920s to 2016, France has led the world with its diverse music, from hot jazz to electronica. You have previously cited that artists like Serge Gainsbourg were unavoidable growing up in France. Does this mean we might see The Limiñanas experiment with current unavoidable French artists like Daft Punk or Justice in your new records, or do prefer to build on past styles of music?

In pop music the French has never been anything else other than recycling the work of Anglo-Saxon. We do not live in the past, and follow neither the methods nor the trends of today. We just do our thing in isolation. The way albums are produced today, with the same Pro-tools, the same compression and equalization tools deeply bore us. This is part of a kind of global ‘soup’ without asperity.

We never raised the question of influences when we record a new album, it does not bind either direction. Things happen naturally.

But People like Billy Childish or Andrew Weatherall will be always references for us, whether through their approach to business or music production. Billy Childish has an instantly recognizable, a unique way of arranging and composing and the same goes for his paintings. Gainsbourg had it too, even if he was a leading recycler.

Peter Hook features on lead single ‘Garden of Love’. Do you have any memorable experiences from working with him and did he give you any valuable advice or insight into song writing?

Working with Peter Hook was very simple, we sent him a demo on which he worked on in his studio. He recorded the bass parts and hearts that we then got mixed ici (sic). When I received the tracks I was just like a kid. As soon as I had them mounted, the song took a turn, a sound completely different. We are really proud and happy to have done this title with him.

You are currently on tour with previous collaborator Pascal Comelade. How has that experience been and do you plan on touring with Peter Hook and the Light in the near future as well?

We are starting our tour to promote ‘Malamore’ our new album, and will be released on April 15th through Because Music.  On the first dates we will play with Ivan Telefunken & Pascal Comelade who we recorded “Traité de guitarres triolectique” released last year.

When we play with Pascal Comelade and Ivan Telefunken they raise the tension when on stage with us. From the moment they start playing music it actually becomes more powerful, sonic, there is something cerebral too, thanks to repetition, the piano, & the noisy guitars of Ivan. All songs are composed around the riff and repetition. And it takes a different direction when Ivan and Pascal are there. We’re going to play new tracks from ‘Malamore’ re-arranged with Ivan and Pascal  & some tracks from “Traité de guitarres triolectiques”

And yes! We would love to do concerts with Peter Hook and the Light.

BOOM! : The Limiñanas 'Garden of Love'



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